And sharks again. Predator populations on the beaches of New York are on the rise

Sharks again. Predator populations on the beaches of New York are on the rise

< p>The news about the increase in the number of sharks off the coast of New York stunned the locals. Everyone remembers the recent cannibal attacks in Egypt on the Red Sea. However, experts see this event as positive. Sharks love clean and warm ocean, and also — plenty of fish for dinner. In general, a healthy ecosystem has formed.

Scientists confirm that such a number of predators did not exist either 10 or 15 years ago. In addition, not only sharks were found, but also several whales with dolphins — incredible fact.

Another reason why officials have started noticing more sharks is the arrival of modern technology. Local lifeguards are stepping up their activities, including increasing patrols of coastal waters with the help of boats, helicopters and jet skis. At both Jones Beach in New York and Robert Moses State Park, seven new drones have joined the tracking process, operated by 20 lifeguards and beach staff as part of the aerial shark surveillance program.

Sharks known as a key species that has a huge impact on the entire ecosystem. Without sharks, the smaller species that sharks feed on would experience a population boom, which would inevitably lead to the absorption of even smaller species and ultimately — to the extinction of the oceans. The algae and bacteria will move onto the corals, cover them, and the corals will die fairly quickly. And this reality is not so far away. The World Wildlife Fund notes that 17 of the 39 species of megamouth sharks are endangered.

And one more point that scientists note: sharks, no matter how big or intimidating they may look, really do not want to have nothing to do with the person. They would rather swim around and never run into people in their lives. Shark attacks off the coast of New York are extremely rare, so do not be too afraid, experts reassure.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.